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Showing posts tagged: electricity click to see more stuff tagged with electricity
Tue
Nov 11 2014 10:30am

Something Happened: Revival by Stephen King

Stephen King Revival

Whether you love his work or loathe it—and there are those who do, difficult as that is for those who don’t to discern—you’ve got to give Stephen King credit, in the first for working so damned hard. Over the forty years of his career, he’s written fifty-odd novels, and financially, you have to imagine he’d have been sitting pretty after the first five.

This, then, isn’t a man who does what he does for the money. Demonstrably, I dare say, he does it for the fun, and that’s a fine thing, I think; after all, to paraphrase Dreamcatcher’s central character, doing the same shit day after day does get dull, and dull is the last thing a writer writing recreationally can afford to be. To escape that fate, King has reinvented himself repeatedly in recent years. He’s come up with a couple of very credible crime thrillers, commingled conspiracy with the stuff of science fiction and composed love letters to the old days and ways.

In that respect, Revival is a real throwback. A supernatural horror novel of the sort Constant Reader hasn’t seen since Duma Key, it’s classic King, complete with fantastic characters, a suggestive premise and an ending I’m going to politely describe as divisive.

[Read More]

Thu
Jan 12 2012 1:30pm

Bowie and Tesla: The Prestige Connection

David Bowie as Nikola Tesla

There’s a lot to love about The Prestige. Stage magicians. The Batman team of Bale and Cain. But perhaps the best thing about the movie, in my mind, was David Bowie assuming the role of Nikola Tesla. It seems that kind of perfect Hollywood casting, not only for Bowie’s wonderful performance, but for the similarities between the two men. 

[Read on for how they compare...]

Fri
Jul 10 2009 2:38pm

From Death Ray to Star Wars: Nikola Tesla's WMD

Genius inventor Nikola Tesla is responsible for A/C current, the radio, the remote control, and...the death of thousands? One of his ideas chillingly mirrored the infant Manhattan Project, which he refused to work on for ethical reasons, preferring his own weapon of mass destruction:

“This ‘death-beam,’ Dr. Tesla said, will operate silently but effectively at distances “as far as a telescope could see an object on the ground and as far as the curvature of the earth would permit it.” It will be invisible and will leave no marks behind it beyond its evidence of destruction. An army of 1,000,000 dead, annihilated in an instant, he said, would not reveal even under the most powerful microscope just what catastrophe had caused its destruction. - The New York Times, 11 July 1934

Naturally, this Death Ray would be used to—what else?—“make war impossible.”

Fear will keep the local systems in line, sure, but was it ever built? By the Russians, or maybe Ronald Regan? Could Superman withstand it? In honor of Tesla’s 153rd birthday, listen to Mike Daisey’s tale of Nikola Tesla’s legendary Death Ray. This segment originally aired on Studio 360; visit PBS for more about Tesla’s strange genius.