Selfies September 17, 2014 Selfies Lavie Tidhar Smile for the camera. When Gods and Vampires Roamed Miami September 16, 2014 When Gods and Vampires Roamed Miami Kendare Blake A Goddess Wars story As Good As New September 10, 2014 As Good As New Charlie Jane Anders She has three chances to save the world. Tuckitor’s Last Swim September 9, 2014 Tuckitor’s Last Swim Edith Cohn A hurricane is coming.
From The Blog
September 18, 2014
Cast As Thou Wilt: Kushiel’s Dart Dream Cast
Natalie Zutter
September 17, 2014
How Goldfinger Bound Sci-Fi to James Bond
Ryan Britt
September 15, 2014
Rereading the Empire Trilogy: Servant of the Empire, Part 1
Tansy Rayner Roberts
September 13, 2014
If You Want a Monster to Hunt, You’ll Get It. Doctor Who: “Listen”
Chris Lough
September 11, 2014
The Ghostbusters are an Antidote to Lovecraft’s Dismal Worldview
Max Gladstone
Sun
Sep 7 2014 12:01pm

Announcing the 2014 British Fantasy Awards Winners

The winners of the British Fantasy Awards 2014, as announced on Sunday, 7 September 2014, at the awards banquet at FantasyCon 2014 in York. The nominees in each category were decided by the voters of the British Fantasy Society, FantasyCon 2012 and FantasyCon 2014, with the juries having a discretion to add up to two further egregious omissions in each category.

[Read more]

Tue
Sep 2 2014 12:00pm

Short Fiction Spotlight: Time Will Tell

The Bone Clocks David Mitchell

Welcome back to the Short Fiction Spotlight, a weekly column dedicated to doing exactly what it says in the header: shining a light on the some of the best and most relevant fiction of the aforementioned form.

The longlist of novels nominated for this year’s Man Booker Prize is notable for any number of reasons. The prevalence of American authors in a field formerly dominated by Brits and writers hailing from the countries of the Commonwealth can hardly come as a surprise, being a direct effect of the new rules, but the lack of big hitters—foremostly favourites like Martin Amis and Ian McEwan—indubitably does.

David Mitchell’s longlisting for his new book, The Bone Clocks, bucks both of the aforementioned trends. Aside a sojourn in Sicily and eight years of teaching in Hiroshima, he’s a University of Kent-educated Englishman who has been what you might describe as a Booker bridesmaid not once or twice but thrice: for number9dream, Cloud Atlas, and finally, four Prizes past, for The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet. Could 2014 be his year? Having read ‘The Right Sort,’ an experimental short set in the same world as the author’s upcoming novel, I’d put to you that it’s a real possibility.

[Read More]

Wed
Aug 20 2014 9:30am

Should the World Fantasy Award be Changed?

World Fantasy Award Howard HP Lovecraft

Daniel José Older, author and editor of Long Hidden, recently started a Change.org petition to redesign the World Fantasy Award. This has led to signatures and celebration, as well as some controversy. His petition’s immediate request is that the WFAC change the award to resemble Octavia Butler. The current WFA statuette (shown here) is a stylized bust of H.P. Lovecraft. Designed by the great Gahan Wilson, it is a striking piece of sculpture—but it is also a reminder of the community’s contentious past.

So there is also a larger question that needs to be heard: who is SFF’s audience? Who is this community for?

[Read more]

Sun
Aug 17 2014 3:00pm

Announcing the 2014 Hugo Award Winners

2014 Hugo Award nominees The winners of the 2014 Hugo Awards have been announced!

The Hugo Awards have been given since 1953, and every year since 1955, by the annual World Science Fiction Convention (the “Worldcon”). The first Worldcon occurred in New York City in 1939, and Worldcons have been held annually since then, except during World War II. This year’s Worldcon, LonCon 3, was held in London, England.

Congratulations to all the 2014 winners and nominees!

[2014 Hugo nominees]

Fri
Aug 15 2014 2:00pm

Announcing the 2014 Chesley Award Winners

The winners for the 2014 Chesley Awards, celebrating science fiction and fantasy art, have been announced! The Chesleys are given by the Association of Science Fiction and Fantasy Artists each year. This year’s ceremony took place on August 15th at the 72st World Science Fiction convention, LonCon.

Congratulations to all the nominees and winners!

[Chesley Award 2014 winners]

Thu
Aug 14 2014 3:49pm

Announcing the Winners of the 1939 Retro Hugo Awards!

The Hugo Awards have been given since 1953, and every year since 1955, by the annual World Science Fiction Convention (the “Worldcon”). The first Worldcon occurred in New York City in 1939, and Worldcons have been held annually since then, except during World War II.

The Retro Hugo Awards celebrate the works that attendees would have known at the time of the very first Worldcon, held in New York in 1939. These prestigious awards recognise the best in science fiction, fantasy, and fandom from 1938.

This year, the Retro Hugo Awards were co-presented by Mary Robinette Kowal and Rob Shearman at LonCon3 in London, England.

[Read More]

Mon
Aug 11 2014 12:05pm

Donald Sutherland Accepted His Teen Choice Award as President Snow By Throwing Berries at the Audience

Donald Sutherland Teen Choice Award President Snow throwing berries video The Hunger Games Catching Fire

There was no question that Donald Sutherland would take home the Teen Choice Award surfboard for Choice Movie Villain. Despite Kate Winslet’s piercing glare in Divergent and Michael Fassbender’s full-body Magneto clench in X-Men: Days of Future Past, there was really no competition with Sutherland’s calm, chilling, malevolent President Snow from The Hunger Games: Catching Fire.

What did surprise us, however, was how adorably Sutherland accepted his award—by tossing berries at the teenaged audience.

[Watch the video]

Fri
Jul 25 2014 3:25pm

SymboGen Cares About Your Hugo Vote: Parasite by Mira Grant

Mira Grant—a penname for Seanan McGuire—can often be found on the Hugo ballot, and this year is no different. Admittedly, the central conceit of Parasite is a large pill to swallow, and takes a bit of handwaving to gloss over the details.

In Grant’s near future thriller, the majority of the world has willingly ingested an Intestinal Bodyguard, a designer parasite intended to aid our weakened immune systems. On top of that, all the parasites are all owned by a single company—SymboGen. But once you’re on board, Grant unfurls an interesting and briskly-paced narrative.

[SymboGen cares about your health…]

Wed
Jul 23 2014 11:30am

Voting the Categories: A Guide to the 2014 Hugo Novelette Finalists

Hugo award nominees 2014 novelette The Hugo ballot is officially open, and the time has come to perform the laborious task of deciding among excellence. And, while much of the attention of the voting community tends to concentrate on the Best Novel finalists, we at Tor.com all felt that this year’s short fiction field was exceptionally strong. I’ve decided to help guide readers through the short story, novelette, and novella finalists in preparation for voting.

This week I discuss the novelette category. While there are a number of very strong candidates on the novelette ballot, the inclusion of one story has made it controversial. I cannot claim that this will be a complete look at the category, as I have not and will not read one of the candidate stories.

[Read more]

Tue
Jul 22 2014 1:00pm

The Hugos and The Wheel of Time: A Satisfying End to the Series

The Hugo Awards! The Wheel of Time! I feel like I have talked about this before!

Because I have. I talked about it back when I was advocating for the series to get nominated in the first place, and then I put together a big giant refresher post on it to boot. So this is not virgin territory to me.

However, given that the deadline for this year’s Hugo voting is fast approaching, it is probably meet that I should speak of it again, and talk about why I think the Wheel of Time deserves to win for Best Novel.

Because I think it does. Click the link to see why!

[Warning: Here there be opinions dragons. A Series of them, even]

Mon
Jul 21 2014 2:30pm

Ken Liu has Won a Seiun Award!

Ken Liu has won a Seiun Award! His 2013 work, “The Paper Menagerie,” won in the “Best Translated Short Story” category.

The Seiun Awards were founded in 1970, and are voted on by the participants of the annual Japan Science Fiction Convention. (While Seiun literally means “nebula” in Japanese, the award is not affiliated with the Nebulas.) Previous award winners in the translated short story category include Thomas Disch, Roger Zelazny, and Greg Bear.

“The Paper Menagerie” has already been awarded the Hugo, Nebula, and World Fantasy Awards, and you can read it over at io9! You can also find original short fiction by Ken Liu here on Tor.com.

Fri
Jul 18 2014 9:00am

The Art of Julie Dillon

Julie Dillon

Julie Dillon. Twice nominated for a Hugo Award for Best Artist, she’s become synonymous with awards ballots. The Chesley Award, Spectrum, and the World Fantasy Award, among others, have all named her as one of the finest illustrators working in science fiction and fantasy art.

Oddly, she remains under used in the cover game, with only a handful to her credit among major publishing houses. And among cover artists, her name recognition in comparison to stalwarts like John Harris and Michael Whelan lags behind, which is a fact not long for this world. Because Julie Dillon has something few artists lay claim to, a distinctive point of view.

[Read More]

Thu
Jul 17 2014 3:00pm

Banking on the Hugos: Neptune’s Brood by Charles Stross

Charles Stross is a mainstay on genre award ballots every year; 2014 marks his seventh appearance on the short list for the Hugo Award for Best Novel. There’s good reason for these accolades because when it comes to plausible and well-thought out future scenarios, few can invent better scenarios than Stross.

Neptune’s Brood, in this case, imagines a post-human, far future where we as humanity have become a thing of the past often referred to as Fragiles. The novel is many things, but a primary thrust revolves around economics in the future and a supposed defrauding scam as it features Krina Alizond-118 on her journeys through the galaxy.

[Pirates and banking?]

Wed
Jul 16 2014 2:00pm

Voting the Categories: A Guide to the 2014 Hugo Novella Finalists

Hugo Awards The Hugo ballot is officially open, and the time has come to perform the laborious task of deciding among excellence. And, while much of the attention of the voting community tends to concentrate on the Best Novel finalists, we at Tor.com all felt that this year’s short fiction field was equally deserving of attention. I’ve decided to help guide readers through the short story, novelette, and novella finalists in preparation for voting. You can find the short story discussion here.

This week I discuss the novella category. The five finalists display an impressive range of styles and genres, and since two of the entries were also nominated for both the Nebula and the World Fantasy Award, the competition is fierce.

[Read more]

Sun
Jul 13 2014 11:00am

2013 Shirley Jackson Award Winners Announced

The winners for the 2013 Shirley Jackson Awards have been announced! Awarded every year in recognition of the legacy of Shirley Jackson, the awards honor exceptional work in the literature of psychological suspense, horror, and dark fantasy.

We are especially proud to report that Veronica Schanoes’ Tor.com story “Burning Girls” won for Best Novella.

This year’s Shirley Jackson Awards were presented at Readercon 25. Congratulations to all the nominees and winners!

[Check out the winners!]

Fri
Jul 11 2014 9:30am

Why I’m Voting for Ann Leckie’s Ancillary Justice

Ancillary Justice Ann Leckie Hugo nomineeWhen thinking about Ann Leckie’s Ancillary Justice, the first thing that comes to my mind is gummy worms. Sour gummy worms, to be precise, are a very specific desire. When you want a sour gummy worm nothing else will do. Seriously, nothing else. The second thing that comes to mind are macaroons, those little delicious crispy baked goods that have replaced the cupcake as the pastry du jour.

Yes, Ancillary Justice is like gummy worms and macaroons, combined. Early buzz meant that readers were craving Ann Leckie’s debut novel, and finally getting to read it was both satisfying and sweet.

[Read More]

Thu
Jul 10 2014 1:30pm

Voting the Categories: A Guide to the 2014 Hugo Short Story Finalists

Hugo Awards The Hugo ballot is officially open, and the time has come to perform the laborious task of deciding among excellence. And, while much of the attention of the voting community tends to concentrate on the Best Novel finalists, we at Tor.com all felt that this year’s short fiction field was exceptionally strong. I’ve decided to help guide readers through the short story, novelette, and novella finalists in preparation for voting.

This week I discuss the short story category. This is, in my opinion, the most competitive category on the ballot. These stories are strong, interesting, compelling, and well-worth your time. So, without further ado, let’s get right to it.

[Read more]

Wed
Jul 9 2014 11:00am

Rocket Talk Episode 17: Hugo-Nominated Short Stories

Rocket Talk

In this episode of Rocket Talk, Justin is joined by bloggers Natalie Luhrs and Jenny Thurman to hash out the Hugo Award ballot for short stories. For reference purposes, those stories include:

The three argue over which story is best and then declare their winners at the end! Some jokes are made. Some serious stuff is discussed.

[Listen here!]

Wed
Jul 9 2014 12:47am

2014 World Fantasy Lifetime Achievement Awards Announced

world fantasy lifetime achievement award ellen datlow chelsea quinn yabro

From November 6th to the 9th in Washington, DC, the 2014 World Fantasy Convention will convene, where, among many events, it will honor this year’s lifetime achievement awards. Past winners have included Jane Yolen, Robert Bloch, Ursula K. Le Guin, George R. R. Martin and many, many others. This year, World Fantasy will be honoring Ellen Datlow and Chelsea Quinn Yarbro. 

[Read more]