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Showing posts tagged: Robert J. Sawyer click to see more stuff tagged with Robert J. Sawyer
Fri
Mar 29 2013 5:00pm

Science Fiction Killed The Dinosaurs

Though not the largest extinction in the history of our little planet, the collective death of the dinosaurs still stings. But what was it that caused their untimely demise? The going thinking tends to agree with the Alvarez Hypothesis and points an accusatory finger at a large asteroid, with the smoking gun being the infamous Chicxulub Crater in the Yucatan Peninsula. There’s also the notion of increased volcanism and other climate change issues too. But what if it wasn’t any of these things? What if a science fiction thing killed the dinosaurs?

[Read more]

Wed
Apr 18 2012 4:00pm

Though not the largest extinction in the history of our little planet, the collective death of the dinosaurs still stings. Never mind that we probably wouldn’t have evolved if they were still around nor would Jurassic Park have ever been made, the point is, the dinosaurs are missed. But what was it that caused their untimely demise? The going thinking tends to agree with the Alvarez Hypothesis and points an accusatory finger at a large asteroid, with the smoking gun being the infamous Chicxulub Crater in the Yucatan Peninsula. There’s also the notion of increased volcanism and other climate change issues too. But what if it wasn’t any of these things? What if a science fiction thing killed the dinosaurs?

Below are five instances when the extinction of our favorite terrible lizards occurred through science fictional means.

[Read more]

Sun
Sep 4 2011 10:30am

The 1999 Hugo Awards were presented at Aussiecon Three, in Melbourne, Australia. The best novel winner was Connie Willis’s time travel romp To Say Nothing of the Dog (post) a book I like a great deal and an excellent winner. Willis is a master of the screwball comedy, and here she’s working with wonderful material like Victorian England, cats and dogs living together, jumble sales, and the significance of art and love on history. It’s in print, and it’s in the library (the Grande Bibliotheque as usual) in English and French.

[Read more: other nominees, other categories, etc.]

Sun
Aug 28 2011 10:30am

The 1998 Hugo Awards were voted on by the members at BucConeer in Baltimore, and presented at that convention. The best novel award was won by Joe Haldeman’s Forever Peace, a book about the horrors of near future war solved by telepathic niceness. It’s a thematic sequel to The Forever War, not a direct sequel. This is by far my least favourite of Haldeman’s works. I’ve only read it once. Forever Peace is in print, and it’s in the library (the Grande Bibliotheque) in French and English.

[Read more: other nominees, other categories, etc.]

Sun
Aug 21 2011 10:30am

The 1997 Hugo Awards were presented at LoneStarCon II, in San Antonio, Texas. The best novel winner was Kim Stanley Robinson’s Blue Mars, which I have not read because of issues with Red Mars, as previously mentioned. It’s the conclusion to Robinson’s trilogy about terraforming Mars. It’s in print and it’s in the Grande Bibliotheque (hereafter “the library”) in French and English.

[Read more: other nominees, other categories, etc.]

Sun
Aug 14 2011 10:30am

The 1996 Hugo Awards were presented at LACon III in Anaheim California. The Best Novel Hugo was won by Neal Stephenson’s The Diamond Age, which has always struck me as two-thirds of a really brilliant book. It’s a scintillating nanotech future with huge social changes consequent to the changes in technology, and there’s a book and a girl shaped by the book, and an actress, and neo-Victorians, and everything is going along swimmingly... and then a miracle occurs and the end falls down in flinders. Nevertheless, even as a book where the end doesn’t work for me I think this is a good Hugo winner, because it’s relentlessly inventive and exciting and doing science fictional things that hadn’t been done before. It’s a groundbreaking book. It’s in print, and it’s in the library (the Grande Bibliotheque) in English and French.

[Read more: other nominees, other categories, etc.]

Sun
Sep 12 2010 1:02pm

Why should pen & ink have all the fun? Audioslice stretches the Hugo celebration to the max, turning the dial to 11 with this round-up of audiobook excerpts from 2010’s science fiction and fantasy rockstars.

Listening to these titles rather than reading them does beg the question... if you’d judged these same titles on audiobook instead of in print, so you think your vote have been different?

[Click through for free audio excerpts of the Hugo winners!]

Thu
Dec 17 2009 6:34pm

Who’s a badass? Hutch is a badass. In my inbox today, a note from podnovelist extraordinaire J.C. Hutchins, who, aside from allowing us to post links to the free-for-listening audio of his novel,7Th Son, The Descent, is also a guest blogger on Tor.com:

I recently coordinated and created a free “holiday sampler” PDF featuring excerpts from 12 authors, designed to expose their books to new readers. SFF is proudly represented throughout....

A quick look at the page for In the Nick of Time, the aforementioned holiday sampler, and it’s clear what a fantastic idea this is:

[List of authors beyond the cut!]

Thu
Aug 7 2008 5:03am

Part four of our review of the covers for the 2008 Hugo nominees, in which we STFU and let you guys take over the reviewing duties, since it’s a Tor Book, and we're just too close to the work. Part one of this week-long series is here, part two is here, and part three is here.

Rollback coverRollback by Robert J. Sawyer (Tor; Analog Oct. 2006-Jan./Feb. 2007)
Design by Jamie Stafford-Hill.

A slightly longer synopsis this time (from the Tor-Forge website). You know, since I can’t totally stfu: Dr. Sarah Halifax decoded the first-ever radio transmission received from aliens. Thirty-eight years later, a second message is received and Sarah, now 87, may hold the key to deciphering this one, too . . . if she lives long enough.
A wealthy industrialist offers to pay for Sarah to have a rollback—a hugely expensive experimental rejuvenation procedure. She accepts on condition that Don, her husband of sixty years, gets a rollback, too. The process works for Don, making him physically twenty-five again. But in a tragic twist, the rollback fails for Sarah, leaving her in her eighties.
While Don tries to deal with his newfound youth and the suddenly vast age gap between him and his wife, Sarah struggles to do again what she‘d done once before: figure out what a signal from the stars contains.

So, what are your thoughts on this cover?

[larger image after the fold]

Tue
Jul 22 2008 9:03pm

Once upon a time I was a book reviewer for Publishers Weekly. Although my name wasn't on the reviews, the fact that they appeared in PW made me one of the most influential SF/fantasy reviewers in the world. I wasn't a big fan of the weekly deadlines, but I did have lots of fun getting the first word in on a wide variety of important SF and fantasy. One of the side effects was that I was as au courant with the field as I've ever been, and probably ever will be.

That meant that when Hugo nomination time came around, I already knew what I wanted to nominate; and when it was time to vote, I'd already read all the nominees.

Nowadays, being busy trying to find and publish future Hugo winners of my own, I just can't keep up. Every year this century I've sworn I would take a week off and read all the nominees -- the ceremony is much more fun if you've voted and have a rooting interest -- and every year I haven't managed it. (To my mind, people who vote without reading the nominees are beneath contempt.)

This year was no exception.

So I'm going to take advantage of the shiny new soap box provided by Tor.com to find out what I've been missing.

Here's a list of the Hugo nominees for best novel:

* The Yiddish Policemen's Union by Michael Chabon (HarperCollins; Fourth Estate)
* Brasyl by Ian McDonald (Gollancz; Pyr)
* Rollback by Robert J. Sawyer (Tor; Analog Oct. 2006-Jan./Feb. 2007)
* The Last Colony by John Scalzi (Tor)
* Halting State by Charles Stross (Ace)

The only one of these I've read is Michael Chabon's book, which I loved (and which, to my pleasant surprise, won the Nebula). So I'd like you to tell me which one you think should win (and why) and which one you think will win. (Alas, you can't influence my uncast vote, since the voting deadline was back on July 7th.)

I'm sure the results will be enlightening, and I look forward to seeing what you have to say. (No extra credit for picking a Tor book!)

[2005 Hugo Award image from Wikipedia Commons; reproducible for any purpose.]