The Colonel July 29, 2014 The Colonel Peter Watts The hives are sleeping giants. <em>To Eternity</em> July 24, 2014 To Eternity Wesley Allsbrook and Barrie Potter If all things were normal, Stuart would be considered quite a catch. Brisk Money July 23, 2014 Brisk Money Adam Christopher It's hard out there for a robotic detective. A Short History of the Twentieth Century, or, When You Wish Upon A Star July 20, 2014 A Short History of the Twentieth Century, or, When You Wish Upon A Star Kathleen Ann Goonan A rocket story.
From The Blog
July 29, 2014
Introduction to the H. P. Lovecraft Reread
Ruthanna Emrys and Anne M. Pillsworth
July 25, 2014
Huge New Cast and Bloopers. Highlights from the San Diego Comic Con Game of Thrones Panel
Chris Lough
July 22, 2014
What Makes Chinese Science Fiction Chinese?
Xia Jia
July 22, 2014
Everything I Learned from the Buffy Rewatch
Alyx Dellamonica
July 21, 2014
If This is the Plot for Star Wars: Episode VII, I Will Be Sad
Emily Asher-Perrin
Showing posts tagged: Comics click to see more stuff tagged with Comics
Sat
Jul 26 2014 7:20pm

Sandman Overture #3 Gives us a Preview!

Sandman Overture #3 should be coming out next Wednesday, July 30th (only a year after the first issue was teased at San Diego Comic Con...), and we'll have a review for you! In the meantime, we have a preview...so skip this if you don't want any spoilers!

[Read more]

Fri
Jul 25 2014 11:15am

“Longer lines at the ladies room.” SDCC and the Increased Presence of Women in Comics

female heroes marvel SDCC

The SDCC schedule this year is notable for its abundance of panels about female characters and women in comics and games—Monday alone featured “Female Heroes, Then and Now,” “Beyond Clichés: Creating Awesome Female Characters for Film, TV, Comics, Video Games, and Novels,” and “The Most Dangerous Women at Comic-Con.” All of these panels were well-attended—in fact, I couldn’t even get into “Beyond Clichés.” As the weekend progresses, themes are bound to emerge, and it will be interesting to see where it goes.

[Read More]

Thu
Jul 24 2014 11:30am
Original Comic

To Eternity

Wesley Allsbrook and Barrie Potter

To Eternity Wesley Allsbrook Barrie Potter

If all things were normal, Stuart would be considered quite a catch.

In this short (romance?) comic by Barrie Potter and Wesley Allsbrook, things are not normal.

[Read To Eternity by Wesley Allsbrook]

Wed
Jul 23 2014 12:30pm

A Brief History of Batman’s Trunks

Batman’s trunksIn honor of Batman's 75th anniversary, we're rerunning this article on the caped crusader's costume, which originally appeared on Tor.com in February 2011.

Let’s get something straight here: they’re trunks, not underwear. Nobody but losers wear their underwear on the outside—and Batman ain’t no loser, see?

We’ve lost many precious things as a society over the centuries, but perhaps one of the saddest would have to be the racial memory of the origins of superhero costumes. The ability to look at the Caped Crusader’s fighting togs and see nothing but the proud heritage of the circus performer is slipping farther and farther away from us—and we are poorer for it. What was once simply a piece of apparel not too dissimilar to bathing trunks is now ridiculed as “underwear on the outside.” The universe weeps.

[Read more]

Tue
Jul 22 2014 5:00pm

Bringing Back the Golden Age: An Interview with Adam Christopher and Chuck Wendig

Adam Christopher Chuck Wendig interview The Shield Archie Comics Archie Comics is pairing a new look and new writers with some of their best-known titles in their new Dark Circle superhero imprint. The Black Hood, The Shield, and The Fox are all scheduled for a reboot in early 2015. The Shield in particular is looking at some major changes, including a gender-swapped cast of characters that will introduce a female Shield in “Daughter of the Revolution.” 

Adam Christopher (The Burning Dark, Hang Wire) and Chuck Wendig (The Blue Blazes, Mockingbird) are pooling their experience with novels, film, comics, television, and everything in between to co-write The Shield. They recently answered a few questions about gender, the Golden Age, and the inspiration behind the new series. We’ve got their thoughts, along with a heaping pile of heroism and justice, below the cut! 

[Read More]

Thu
Jul 17 2014 2:00pm
Excerpt

The Rise of Aurora West (Comic Excerpt)

Paul Pope

The extraordinary world introduced in Paul Pope's Battling Boy is rife with monsters and short on heroes... but in this action-driven extension of the Battling Boy universe, we see it through a new pair of eyes: Aurora West, daughter of Arcopolis's last great hero, Haggard West.

A prequel to Battling Boy, The Rise of Aurora West follows the young hero as she seeks to uncover the mystery of her mother's death, and to find her place in a world overrun with supernatural monsters and all-too-human corruption. With a taut, fast-paced script from Paul Pope and JT Petty and gorgeous, kinetic art from David Rubin, The Rise of Aurora West (the first of two volumes) is a tour de force in comics storytelling.

The Rise of Aurora West is out on September 30th from First Second Books, but you can read an excerpt now!

[Read an excerpt from The Rise of Aurora West by Paul Pope]

Thu
Jul 17 2014 1:20pm

Adam Christopher and Chuck Wendig Will Revive and Gender-Flip Classic Hero The Shield

Archie Comics has announced the first three titles in their Dark Circle superhero imprint! The Shield, from writers Adam Christopher (The Burning Dark, “Cold War”) and Chuck Wendig (Blackbirds) and artist Wilfredo Torres (The Shadow: Year One); The Black Hood from writer Duane Swierczynski (Judge Dredd, X, Birds of Prey) and artist Michael Gaydos (ALIAS); and The Fox from writer/artist Dean Haspiel (Billy Dogma, HBO’s Bored to Death) and scripter Mark Waid (Daredevil, Kingdom Come, founder of Thrillbent).

The titles will be overseen by editor Alex Segura, and will launch early next year. They will all serve as jumping on points for new readers, using characters from Dark Circle Comics in unique new ways.

The Shield (pictured here) will be a gender-flipped version of a classic all-American hero who originally debuted in 1940 (predating Captain America!) and will be a new way to explore history. Adam Christopher said of the title: “We’ve all poured a lot of love into the new Shield—she’s a very powerful, very modern female superhero. And that I think is something to celebrate.”

We can’t wait to see her adventures!

Thu
Jul 17 2014 11:17am

Falcon is the New Captain America!

Sam Wilson, Captain America

It’s not exactly unusual for people other than Steve Rogers to take up Captain America’s iconic shield, but coming off the announcement of the brand new female Thor, this is liable to stir the pot even more—Sam Wilson (also known as Falcon) will be Cap in the comics, starting this October.

[Read more]

Wed
Jul 16 2014 5:00pm

The Pop Quiz at the End of the Universe: Mike Huddleston

Mike Huddleston pop quiz interview Welcome back to The Pop Quiz at the End of the Universe, a recurring series here on Tor.com featuring some of our favorite science fiction and fantasy authors, artists, and others!

Today we’re joined by Mike Huddleston, a comics illustrator who has worked on a variety of titles, including Gen13 and Harley Quinn. Along with author David Lapham, Huddleston is currently in production on a comics adaptation of Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan’s The Strain trilogy. Four trade paperbacks of the series are currently available from Dark Horse, and issue one of The Strain: The Night Eternal story arc publises August 20th.

What mystical connection does Mike share with a microscopic bear? Read on to find out!

[Read More]

Tue
Jul 15 2014 5:00pm

Advice to Aspiring Comic Book Creators

Gene Luen Yang The Shadow Hero

I turned forty last year.

When I was a kid, forty seemed like a lifetime away. I didn’t think about forty all that much, but when I did I imagined I’d have life figured out. By the time I got that old, I’d have cracked the code.

My actual fortieth year has been a blur of ink and airplane trips and diapers. Most days feel chaotic, but it’s a satisfying sort of chaos. And while I definitely haven’t cracked the code, I have learned a few things along the way.

That’s why, when I get asked for advice by aspiring cartoonists, I feel that I have something to offer. The following is for those of you considering a career in comic books. I hope you find it helpful.

[Read More]

Tue
Jul 15 2014 2:15pm

Thor is Now A Title, Not A Name, and the New Thor is A Woman!

New Thor

Mjolnir is switching allegiance! It would seem that plain ol’ thunder-god Thor is heading elsewhere within the Marvel Comics universe, and a new Thor is on the way.

[Details, thoughts, armor...]

Thu
Jul 10 2014 3:15pm

Batgirl Gets a New Creative Team and a Rad New Look

Batgirl new look costume photo new creative team Gail Simone DC Comics

Barbara Gordon’s Batgirl has been through a hell of a lot: getting paralyzed and becoming the hacker hero Oracle in 1986, only to get retconned in DC Comics’ New 52 in 2011, regaining the use of her legs. Not to mention her brother being a serial murderer and her family falling apart.

So, DC is giving her a break. Starting with Batgirl #35, we’ll see the lighter, younger, more hipster-y adventures of Barbara Gordon—a redux complete with a whole new creative team and a much more practical (but thrift store-approved) costume.

[Find out what the new Babs has in common with Veronica Mars and Sherlock Holmes]

Tue
Jul 8 2014 10:00am

The City that Never Sleeps or Goes Away: Harlan Ellison and Star Trek, Again

Leonard Nimoy William Shatner Harlan Ellison City on the Edge of Forever Star Trek

Growing up, I was that annoying kid who was suspicious of The Next Generation like five years after I was potty-trained. Precocious and pretentious about all things Star Trek doesn’t begin to cover it, and when a library book called Inside Star Trek gave me a glimpse of the story behind the story of the most famous classic Trek of them all—“City on the Edge of Forever”—I nodded knowingly. Affectation is a powerful force and when you couple it with little-kid intuition, weird truths can be uncovered. Because even back then, when I first watched Kirk and Spock leap through that giant donut time-machine, something about this adventure felt incomplete.

[Read more]

Mon
Jun 23 2014 10:26am
Original Comic

The Imitation Game

Jim Ottaviani and Leland Purvis

The Imitation Game by Jim Ottaviani and Leland Purvis

Today, Alan Turing is considered the father of theoretical computer science and artificial intelligence. The mathematician, born on June 23, 1912, was a brilliant World War II codebreaker and parlayed that insight into theorizing and creating the first stored-memory computers. Unfortunately, this Officer of the British Empire was persecuted by the British government of the time for his homosexuality and suffered through chemical castration before ending his life.

The Imitation Game by Feynman author Jim Ottaviani and Resistance illustrator Leland Purvis chronicles the life of Turing in a full-size graphic novel. Check back every day this week as Tor.com releases the entire graphic novel in four parts.

[The Imitation Game by Jim Ottaviani and Leland Purvis]

Tue
Jun 24 2014 9:00am

Queering SFF Pride Month: Brainchild by Suzanne Geary

Brainchild suzanna geary digital comic

Of course, it’s not all traditional physical books here in the queer-and-speculative world. Exciting stuff is happening digitally, too, particularly in the world of webcomics—like Suzanne Geary’s Brainchild, which began publication at the end of January this year and is ongoing. The comic currently consists of a prologue and the majority of its first chapter, going regular-and-strong the whole time. The updates roll out on Sundays.

As the site informs us, “Brainchild is a story about paranormal phenomena, bad first impressions, wide-scale conspiracies, a whole bunch of mutants, and everything else your senior year of college can possibly throw at you.” This is Geary’s first major project, and so far, I’m hooked—definitely looking forward to seeing where it goes next.

[Onward.]

Mon
Jun 23 2014 1:30pm

Check Out The Brick Theater’s Comic Book Theater Festival!

The Brick Theater in Williamsburg, Brooklyn is hosting The Comic Book Theater Festival, and I was able to check out a few pieces of cross-media work!

This is the second festival The Brick has hosted, and it features a variety of plays, from superhero riffs to crime drama, and re-imagined Ninja Turtles to a biography of Jack “King” Kirby. The Festival has some offerings from established comics writers including Fred van Lente and Dean Haspiel, as well as newer voices.

I had the opportunity to see three of the shows this weekend, and found the comics-meets-theater format created a great conversation.

[Read More]

Tue
Jun 17 2014 4:00pm

In Praise of Mahjong

Mahjong

I first learned how to play Mahjong in high school. My best friend Arthur, an immigrant from Taiwan, taught me. Mahjong is sort of like a Chinese version of poker, only with tiles instead of cards. Like most games that are able to captivate an entire culture, Mahjong blends skill and luck. Four players sit at a square table, pulling tiles from the neatly stacked wall or pushing them into the mush pot middle. Sessions can often last for hours.

When I told my parents about my new pastime, my mother was thrilled. She’d played with her family when she was young, so she felt like I was reclaiming a piece of her past.

[My father didn’t quite have the same reaction...]

Mon
Jun 9 2014 3:00pm

Queering SFF Pride Month: No Straight Lines edited by Justin Hall

No Straight Lines Justin Hall queer comics anthology Next up on the docket for this month’s Extravaganza, following Nicola Griffith’s historical novel Hild, is a totally different kind of book: No Straight Lines, an anthology of “four decades of queer comics,” published by Fantagraphics Books in 2012. The book opens with a brief history of the development of LGBTQ comics and then progresses through around 300 pages of excerpts and shorts, arranged by time period, that give a broad and engaging glimpse of the field as a whole.

As for its place here: there’s a fascinating overlap between comics and speculative fiction that goes back to the pulps—and that’s also true of queer comics, which often straddle a fine line between genres and audiences. The comic as an outsider artform, as a “genre” work, often stands alongside other, similar types of stories, like the ol’ science fiction and fantasy yarns we tend to enjoy. And, of course, some comics are themselves actually pieces of speculative fiction—superheroes, aliens, superhero aliens, and things like “transformation into other forms” are all pretty common tropes.

[Onward.]

Mon
Jun 9 2014 2:00pm
Original Comic

Charcoal

Ian Daffern

Check out Charcoal, a supernatural story of revenge that takes place at a high school near you! Charcoal is written by Ian Daffern, drawn by Ho Che Anderson with layouts by Kalman Adrasofszky, and edited by Liz Gorinsky.

Trigger warning for self-harm and implied violence.

[Read More]

Wed
Jun 4 2014 10:35am

Banned Books Week 2014 Announces Focus on Comics!

If there’s one thing we here at Tor.com love, it’s discussing Indiana Jones casting rumors the reasons behind book censorship. It’s an endlessly interesting way to look at cultural changes, social progress, and our ideas of who we are as a people. Plus, as you may have guessed, we're resolutely pro-book.

This year’s Banned Books Week topic has just been announced, and it is especially dear to us: the Banned Books committee is partnering with the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund to focus on comics and graphic novels. Check out the announcement below!

[Come with us if you want to fight censorship]